Expressions of Interest

 
 

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST is the title of the latest project of the Postmethodists. Artists have been invited to submit proposals for one of a pair of landmark gateway artworks to be placed at the entrances to the proposed Wellingore - Waddington underground link road. This eco friendly transport link between the two villages would enable smoother and more efficient access to the respective amenities of both villages. It is important to note that the proposed Wellingore - Waddington underground link road is subject to obtaining the necessary statutory approvals and permissions.

HAVE YOUR SAY IN THE SELECTION OF EACH GATEWAY ARTWORK. As the artwork proposals are received they will be displayed in each of the two Broadcaster boards. YOU as a member of the public are invited to vote on the one you consider to be the most appropriate for the indicated sites. Deadline for votes to be received is (extended to) midnight 17 December 2009. (NOW CLOSED) This can be done by emailing the Postmethodists at info@postmethodists.com One vote per person will be accepted.

Please see winner of the Gateway artwork at the bottom of this page.

Participants: Dan Archer (Brandon), Adam Burge (Newark), Helen Frik (Amsterdam), Lynn Fulton (Southwell), Stewart Gough (London), S. Mark Gubb (Cardiff), Alun Williams (New York / Marseillies)

 

Autumn 2009

Proposals

From: Helen Frik

To: info@Postmethodists.com

Subject: tunnel


Dear Post Methodists,


I think that your proposal to link two villages with a tunnel is an excellent one. Moles have been doing it for years. I cannot imagine that anyone would ever regret the cost of the tunneling. I vividly remember a visit as a girl to the underground German Hospital in Guernsey. Impressive: how could you expect sick people to get better underground? And now it is an exciting tourist attraction, appealing to the imagination of thousands. Because imagination is a wonderful thing, as you lot well know. Without it people would not want to live. But how to encourage people to use their imagination? This is the thing.


This imagination is also the thing in art. It's admirable to see now in all museums extended name boards explaining art works, and A4 sheets waving gently in the breeze with factual information. But what no-one tells the people (visitors to the art world) is that you have to want to use your imagination. And your imagination is yours, you have to kindle it yourself, not take it on board from someone else because they might seem to be an expert.

Of course a square canvas hung on a wall with red, yellow and blue rectangles painted on it, separated by black lines, is a bit boring. But it's not if you use your imagination. (I still find it boring, even though I live in Holland where Piet Mondriaan grew up as a nipper, and even though I can take into account the historical context, etc. Just not my cup of tea.) Most of life is boring:  working for money and shopping being the two toppers. What we need is to be able to feel something special when we look at certain things. Not to want to be amused, but to actually put some effort into wondering and dreaming. Why does that black line look so sickly in between those colours, while black is usually such a strong looker?


Which is why I am all for your tunnel.


My proposal is to only use the tunnel on really special occasions. This means that the entrances might get a bit dusty, and after a while no-one would notice them any more. In order for this not to be a problem, I recommend using the tunnel entrance in between times as a friendly place, where you can perhaps get a cup of tea, and a chocolate buscuit, and maybe even some home-made soup. No-one knows exactly when the next OPEN TUNNEL DAY will be, just as it seems to be difficult to say where the next earthquake will be, or how to stop smoking.  Because of this, the huge double doors must be kept clean and shiney. It is of course possible to look through the spyhole in the door into the tunnel, and because both villages will be very proud of their tunnel entrance, and not want to be laughed at by folk who say that it's all fake, they will be able to prove the tunnel is there by using the tunnelphone. They can pick it up to listen to the gossip, or they can tell a secret. It's not a videophone, because it's dark in the tunnel, but sound travels well. It can travel all the way through the tunnel, or stop at a certain point, turn round even. Villagers can listen to the section of tunnel under another village, or pick up on some older sounds which are still traveling.

I"m sure the villagers at both ends, and indeed perhaps villagers from the left out in between villages, will be able to make sure there are some good recordings in the tunnel, perhaps even a play, a poem, a confession, or a most favorite song to enlarge the tunnel. For the more history, the more sounds, the longer the tunnel. The longer the tunnel, the more important and proud the villages will be.


God may even get to hear of it and want to participate, by setting up a suggestion line/box of how he and the angels might be able to be of more real help, now that things are becoming increasingly gloomy for many. And perhaps the angels will provide the lighting for when the tunnel is open.


I look forward to walking through the tunnel one day.

yours,

helen frik

www.helenfrik.com & helenfrik.viewbook.com

Stewart Gough

PRIVET TOPIARY

"The government should pay people to dig holes in the ground and then fill them up."

"that's stupid, why not pay people to build roads and schools"

 "Fine, pay them to build schools. The point is it doesn't matter what they do as long as the government is creating jobs".
  (conversation between John Maynard Keynes and 'the public' (paraphrased) on  www.economicshelp.org/2008/07/john-maynard-keynes-great-economists)



 






















(Fig. 1)


The gateway sculpture marking the entrance/exit of the proposed Wellingore - Waddington underground link road will be an operational monument to the economist John Maynard Keynes.  This will consist of the likeness of a seated Keynes sculpted from a collection of trained and clipped evergreen Privet shrubs (Fig 1.). A 'Privet Topier' will be appointed responsible for the upkeep of the sculpture, ensuring that an accurate Keynesian likeness is maintained and that all surrounding foliage is appropriately well kept all year round.  This newly created position is to be financed through revenues gained from the part nationalisation of the British banking system, such revenues will be referred to hereafter as ''The Public' Hedge Fund'.

The entrance/exit to the underground road itself is to appear as though a large circular hole incorporated into the existing cross road intersection into which the route of the link road will descend.


Appropriately minimal safety/directional and road demarcation signage in conjunction with a sympathetic lighting strategy will be incorporated subject to consultation and approval from the Lincolnshire Highways Agency.  It is to be made clear on all directional signage that the underground link road may be considered as an alternative route to various pre-existing Wellingore to Waddington transport networks.

www.stewartgough.com

Lynn Fulton

Alun Williams

Lynn Fulton

S Mark Gubb

Dan Archer

Adam Burge

Winner of the Public Vote!

Stewart Gough

Image coming